Monthly Archives: February 2019

Garden Excursions

As the days lengthen, and spring approaches, I’m starting to plan some garden visits.  The two journeys I’m going to discuss today remind me, however, that these highly anticipated excursions do not always proceed as smoothly as we’d like them to, and perhaps never more so than when a group of people travel together.

The account of a solitary traveller is often seductive.  The reader is invited to travel as a companion to the author, and enjoys privileged access to locations that would be impossible to see without them.  But the reader’s relationship with a travelling group can be less comfortable.  The reader is now plunged into a situation where the complexities of the group dynamic make the outcome of the journey much less certain.

These two entertaining stories for children from the early 19th century involve trips to Kew and Vauxhall Gardens, both popular visitor attractions at that time.  I love the illustrations for the details they reveal about London life of two hundred years ago.  London is so much smaller, and the countryside so much closer than it is today.  We glimpse cobbled streets, lamp posts, signage and even a pot plant growing on somebody’s windowsill.  The Thames is as full of passenger boats as London’s streets are with taxis today.

The Dandy’s Perambulations (1819), written and illustrated by Isaac Robert Cruikshank (1789 – 1856), the elder brother of celebrated artist George Cruikshank, is a gently satirical account of a visit to Kew Gardens undertaken by two fashionable London dandies.  After a late start and various mishaps along the way, they never reach their destination.

One morning, after getting dressed Mr Pink leaves his home in Southwark to visit MacCarey in a basement flat, (from which he appears to have a business selling potatoes).  Deciding to visit Kew Gardens, the dandies hire velocipedes (an early version of the bicycle without pedals).  Some distance out of London they are attacked by geese, fall into a pond and are rescued by one Peter Parrot:
‘The only Dandy that was seen,
Or known to live, at Turnham Green.’

After losing one of the velocipedes and another unfortunate encounter, this time with a sow and piglets, they admit defeat and decide to come home agreeing;
.. no more to roam
Beyond the eastern town of Bow,
Or farther west than Rotten Row;

The second book has a long title –  A Second Holiday for John Gilpin, or A Voyage to Vauxhall; where, Though he had better Luck than Before, he was far from being contented. (1808).  In this tale, the Gilpin family visit the famous Vauxhall Gardens in south London and although they do reach their destination, the accident prone and reluctant traveller John Gilpin is appalled at the expense of the outing.  The character of John Gilpin would have been well known to readers after the success of William Cowper’s poem The Diverting History of John Gilpin (1782) where Gilpin rides further than he intended on a runaway horse.

Travelling to Vauxhall by boat Gilpin manages to lose his hat in the water, and on arriving at the gardens is ‘vex’d to find that he Four Shillings had to pay.’  An illustration shows the boat landing outside Lambeth Palace and the church St Mary-at-Lambeth (which now houses the Garden Museum).  After listening to some music they have dinner with wine, but John Gilpin thinks, ‘he’d rather had A pot of Trueman’s beer.’  Eventually a coach is called to take them home at yet more expense and Gilpin vows ‘he ne’er would have Another Holiday’.

The message from both these accounts seems to be – choose your garden travelling companions carefully!  Links to the full versions of both texts below:


Lambeth Palace and the church of St Mary-at-Lambeth


Dining at Vauxhall Gardens

Further reading:

The Dandy’s Perambulations  from the Children’s Library, The Internet Archive

A Second Holiday for John Gilpin  from the Children’s Library, The Internet Archive

Robert Cruikshank  Wikipedia

Hackney’s Botanical Cabinet

The Botanical Cabinet 1819  (images The Biodiversity Heritage Library)

If we took a walk along Mare Street in Hackney, east London today it would be hard to imagine this street was once home to one of the most celebrated plant nurseries in England.  Loddiges’ Paradise Field Nursery was founded in the mid-1770s by German born Joachim Conrad Loddiges (1738 -1826), and continued by his son George Loddiges (1786 – 1846) as The Hackney Botanic Nursery Garden.  With its range of heated glasshouses the nursery was famous for growing newly discovered plants from around the globe including the Americas, the Carribean, Australia and the far East.

Loddiges published annual catalogues listing the vast range of plants they stocked for sale.  From 1817 – 1833 the nursery produced The Botanical Cabinet, an illustrated magazine which must have served as a useful companion publication, showing the reader what some of their choicest specimens looked like.  The format followed that of The Botanical Magazine (established in 1787 and still published by Kew Botanical Gardens), with a full page illustration of a flowering plant and a corresponding page of description and cultivation details.

Coloured engravings by George Cooke from the 1819 issue of The Botanical Cabinet show some unusual plants grown by the nursery exactly two hundred years ago.  The magazine also reveals details of the Loddiges’ network of plant collectors, who would send seeds to the nursery or supply plants for the nursery to propagate.

Illustrations of the Loddiges’ hot houses from the 1818 magazine give some idea of the scale and ambition of the nursery.  The Hackney Society publication Loddiges of Hackney (1995) by David Solman provides an in depth study of the nursery’s establishment and eventual decline in the 1850s, as rising land prices in the area made it uneconomic to continue.  Various members of the Loddiges family are buried in the nearby St John-at-Hackney church and Abney Park Cemetery.

Sarracenia purpurea from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

This very singular plant is a native of North America, in bogs and swamps.  It has long been known in this country, having been cultivated before the year 1640, by Tradescant, who was Gardener to King Charles the First.

Passerina Spicata from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

This is a native of the Cape, and was introduced about the year 1787.  It is a pretty greenhouse plant.  Its delicate white flowers, though small, are very neat and pleasing, and it continues in bloom a long time during the autumnal months.

Hedysarum carneum from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

We raised this elegant plant many years since from Caucasian seeds, but very soon lost it.  Lately, however, we have obtained a fresh supply, which has produced us two or three plants, from one of which our figure was taken.

Primula minima from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

We received this elegant little plant from our friend Mr Schleicher, of Bex.  It flowered several times in the course of the summer.  Our drawing was taken in the month of July: it represents the whole plant of its natural size, being scarcely one inch in height, and surmounted by a single flower, which was larger than the whole plant, and of great beauty.

Arum triphyllum zebrinum from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

Cineraria aurantiaca from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

This is a native of the Alps of Switzerland.  We raised it from seeds received in 1817 from our friend Mr Schleicher, of Bex.  It is a hardy perennial, and we consider it a very ornamental plant.

Eucalyptus cordata from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

A native of Van Dieman’s Island (Tasmania).  From its robust habit and rapid growth, it will soon become a tall tree.  The whiteness of its leaves and branches gives it a most interesting appearance, but the flowers are not showy.

Camellia japonica variegata from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

This was one of the first varieties of the Double Camellias seen in this country.  It was brought over from China sometime about the year 1792.  We remember to have seen the first plant, soon after this period, at Sir Charles Raymond’s, Valentine House, Essex.

Stapelia bufonis from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

The curious plant which is now before us flowers in the latter part of the summer.  The blossoms are extremely interesting: their interior surface is wholly rough, with wrinkled protuberances, which together with its livid colour, have occasioned it to be named, as resembling a toad.  It is a native of the arid deserts of South Africa, and was introduced about the year 1800.

Hakea pugioniformis from The Botanical Cabinet 1819

Seeds of this plant were received among some of the first arrivals from Botany Bay.  It is a free grower, and attains the height of four or five feet, forming a handsome greenhouse shrub, and producing plenty of flowers.

Lilium pumilum from The Botanical Cabinet 1819.

We received this beautiful plant from our friend Mr Busch, at St Petersburgh, who sent it us, as being a different plant from the pomponium, which it unquestionably is.  Being a native of Russia, it is perfectly hardy, and may either be kept in a pot (which we prefer) or planted in a border.

Banksia paludosa from The Botanical Cabinet 1819.

A native of New South Wales, whence it was introduced, according to the Kew catalogue, in 1805.

Elevation of the steam apparatus for heating hothouses, &tc at Hackney. The Botanical Cabinet 1818

Ground plan of the Houses at Hackney. The Botanical Cabinet 1818

Further reading:

The Botanical Cabinet 1819

Loddiges of Hackney published by The Hackney Society